CORONAVIRS 4: Call Your Doctor Actively - R.A.M.Z Post CORONAVIRS 4: Call Your Doctor Actively - R.A.M.Z Post

CORONAVIRS 4: Call Your Doctor Actively

coronavirus call the doctor

CORONA?? Call Your Doctor

Please Call Your Doctor if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19 for the advice of further treatment. Before you call your doctor, you must match yourself for checking out symptoms of the said viral disease.

Watch for symptoms of COVID-19

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure (based on the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses).

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

Call Your Doctor.

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

covid-19-Self tester
covid-19-Self tester

There are laboratory tests that can identify the virus that causes COVID-19 in respiratory specimens. State and local public health departments have received tests from CDC while medical providers are getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers. All of these tests are Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase (RT)-PCR Diagnostic Panels that can provide results in 4 to 6 hours.

Who should be tested?

Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. Here is some information that might help in making decisions about seeking care or testing.

  • Most people have mild illness and are able to recover at home.
  • There is no treatment specifically approved for this virus.
  • Testing results may be helpful to inform decision-making about who you come in contact with.

CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are at the discretion of state and local health departments and/or individual clinicians.

  • Clinicians should work with their state and local health departments to coordinate testing through public health laboratories or work with clinical or commercial laboratories.

How to get tested

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, try calling your state or local health department or a medical provider. While supplies of these tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find a place to get tested.

What to do after you are tested

  • If you test positive for COVID-19, see If You Are Sick or Caring for Someone.
  • If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your specimen was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. It is possible that you were very early in your infection at the time of your specimen collection and that you could test positive later, or you could be exposed later and then develop an illness. In other words, a negative test result does not rule out getting sick later.

CDC expects that widespread transmission of COVID-19 in the United States will occur. In the coming months, most of the U.S. population will be exposed to this virus. You should continue to practice all the protective measures recommended to keep yourself and others free from illness. See How to Protect Yourself.

If you are very sick get medical attention immediately

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all-inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

For healthcare professionals

Call Your Doctor

Call Your Doctor. For information on testing for healthcare professionals, see recommendations for reporting, testing, and specimen collection at Interim Guidance for Healthcare Professionals.

Reducing Stigma

Public health emergencies, such as the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), are stressful times for people and communities. Fear and anxiety about a disease can lead to social stigma toward people, places, or things. For example, stigma and discrimination can occur when people associate a disease, such as COVID-19, with a population or nationality, even though not everyone in that population or from that region is specifically at risk for the disease. Stigma can also occur after a person has been released from COVID-19 quarantine even though they are not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others.

Some groups of people who may be experiencing stigma because of COVID-19 include:

  • Persons of Asian descent
  • People who have traveled
  • Emergency responders or healthcare professionals

Stigma hurts everyone by creating fear or anger toward other people.

Stigmatized groups may be subjected to:

  • Social avoidance or rejection
  • Denials of healthcare, education, housing or employment
  • Physical violence.

Stigmatized groups may be subjected to:

  • Social avoidance or rejection
  • Denials of healthcare, education, housing or employment
  • Physical violence.
  • Stigma affects the emotional or mental health of stigmatized groups and the communities they live in. Stopping stigma is important in making communities and community members resilient. See resources on mental health and coping during COVID-19.
  • Everyone can help stop stigma related to COVID-19 by knowing the facts and sharing them with others in your community.

Call Your Doctor. It is important to remember that people – including those of Asian descent – who do not live in or have not recently been in an area of the ongoing spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 or has not been in contact with a person who is a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 are not at greater risk of spreading COVID-19 than other Americans.

covid-19-Self tester
covid-19-Self tester

Read More:

Coronavirus 1: Symptoms, Effects And Precautions For Coronavirus – Stay Healthy

Coronavirus 2: How Can I Protect From Coronavirus?

Coronavirus 3: The FAQs Regarding CoronaVirus Outbreak By WHO

 

Reference: WHO

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